Best Management Practices

Stormwater Treatment

Summary

Best Management Practices

Operational Best Management Practices (BMPs) are changes to everyday practices that staff can do to help stay in compliance with your stormwater permit guidelines, prevent harmful pollutants from entering storm drains, and reduce maintenance intervals.

They keep you in compliance and save money in the long run.

BMPs commonly included as part of a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) include:

  • Sweeping or blowing rather than spraying or power-washing
  • Regularly checking catch basins for debris or pollutants
  • Cleaning storm drains and stormwater lines/pipes
  • Providing secondary containment of materials to stop spills that could contaminate stormwater e.g. spill berms, drum platforms, etc.
  • Covering potentially polluting materials stored outside, covering dumpsters, or storing potential contaminants out of the rain

Resources

What steps should I do next?

5 steps to work through that are straight forward ways to improve Best Management Practices at your site are shown below. Text is directly drawn from Seattle Department of Construction[1] and Inspections, Department of Ecology[2], with additional resources noted.

 

FIND AND PREVENT ·      Where feasible, locate pollution generating activities away from stormwater pathways, such as inlets/catch basins, conveyance pipes, and ditches.

·      Do not hose down or otherwise transport pollutants from any area to the ground, drainage system, combined sewer, or receiving water.

·      Inspect areas used for loading and unloading, material/waste storage, and vehicle parking as needed to prevent pollutant transport off site or to the drainage system.

Ecology advice: Find your storm drains and mark them. Ask your local water/sewer utility for a stencil kit. Keep waste and debris out of storm drains on your property. Prevent wash water from going into storm drains. Keep waste and debris out of the street drain, too

COVER Ecology advice: Keep hazardous materials in closed, sturdy containers with labels. Place containers indoors or under cover. Keep dumpster lids closed.
MAINTAIN Ecology advises: Promptly repair all leaking connections, pipes, hoses, and valves. Have your oil/water separator or catch basin cleaned regularly by a professional.
PREPARE Ecology advice: Put drip pans where spills/leaks are most likely. Clearly label every container. Have a spill kit on site and train your workers how to use it. Use the least toxic material to get the job done.
CLEAN ·      Sweep paved areas used for loading and unloading of materials, outdoor production and manufacturing, and storage as needed to prevent pollutant transport off site or to the drainage system.

·      Promptly contain and clean up solid and liquid leaks and spills (refer to further information provided following (BMP 5) for specific information on spill prevention and cleanup).

Ecology advice: Clean up spills immediately. Inside: sweep up debris and dispose of properly. Don’t sweep it outdoors or wash it into a storm drain. Outside: Sweep and pick up debris on paved areas around your business – especially before heavy rains. Keep hazardous materials out of your dumpster. Contact your local waste disposal program for proper disposal: http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/swfa/mrw/mrw_contacts.html. Click here to find out more on if something can be recycled.

Resources available: Free spill kits are available and distributed by ECOSS along with required training and assistance [https://ecoss.org/projects/puget-sound-spill-kit/], contact ann@ecoss.org for more information.

 

Seattle SDCI provides a list of required site maintenance BMPs to reduce the potential for stormwater to come into contact with pollutants and reduce maintenance intervals for the drainage system and combined sewer as shown below:

 

1 Where feasible, locate pollution generating activities away from stormwater pathways, such as inlets/catch basins, conveyance pipes, and ditches.
2 Sweep paved areas used for loading and unloading of materials, outdoor production and manufacturing, and storage as needed to prevent pollutant transport off site or to the drainage system.
3 Promptly contain and clean up solid and liquid leaks and spills (refer to BMP 5 for specific information on spill prevention and cleanup).
4 Inspect areas used for loading and unloading, material/waste storage, and vehicle parking as needed to prevent pollutant transport off site or to the drainage system.
5 Do not hose down or otherwise transport pollutants from any area to the ground, drainage system, combined sewer, or receiving water

[1]   Seattle Department of Construction https://www.seattle.gov/Documents/Departments/SDCI/Codes/FinalStormwaterManualVolume4.pdf

[2] Department of Ecology <https://apps.ecology.wa.gov/publications/publications/1004017.pdf>

ECOSS Stormwater Best Management Practices Training for Industrial and Commercial Facilities is available at the Washington Stormwater Center.

The video below was produced for the San Diego Unified Port District.

This volume is designed to help businesses, individuals, responsible parties, and public agencies in Seattle implement best management practices (BMPs) for source control to prevent pollutants from contaminating stormwater runoff and entering receiving waters, such as rivers, lakes, streams and Puget Sound.

Polluted stormwater can pose risks to the health, safety, and welfare of humans and the environment. Source control is the practice of preventing pollution at its source.

This chapter provides a worksheet for use in determining which BMPs are required for specific activities, including activities planned for proposed development sites.

As required by the Seattle Municipal Code (SMC), Chapters 22.800 – 22.808 (Stormwater Code), BMPs from this volume must be implemented to minimize contamination and discharge of stormwater from pollution generating activities.

Click the link to view and download the full chapter: https://www.seattle.gov/Documents/Departments/SDCI/Codes/FinalStormwaterManualVolume4.pdf

ECOSS provides regular training through the Private and Public Stormwater Infrastructure Inspection and Maintenance Course 202.

Contact Ann Boyce at ann@ecoss.org, or visit Course 202: Private & Public Stormwater Infrastructure Inspection & Maintenance for more information.

“What’s in a spill kit?

  • Instruction sheet (for cleaning up the spill)
  • Gloves
  • Goggles
  • Two sorbent booms (each about 2′ long)
  • Pads
  • Plastic sheeting (for drain cover)
  • Garbage bags and zip ties
  • Grate hook (for lifting storm drain cover)
  • Spill kit poster” – ( http://www.Seattle.gov)

Visit https://ecoss.org/projects/puget-sound-spill-kit/ and download the Puget Sound Spill Kit Program brochure for more information.

Want to Learn More?  We can help you receive free spill kits, consultation, and instruction. Contact PureBlue at (206) 395-3000, info@pureblue.org

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